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Wellington Daily News - Wellington, KS
My name is Katie Stockstill-Sawyer and my husband, Derek, and I own and operate a farm and livestock operation in Central Kansas.
Loving Hating the Rain
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About this blog
By Katie Stockstill Sawyer
My name is Katie Stockstill-Sawyer and my husband, Derek, and I own and operate a farm and livestock operation in Central Kansas. I married into the farming world in December 2010 and have spent every minute learning all that I can about farming and ...
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New to the Farm
My name is Katie Stockstill-Sawyer and my husband, Derek, and I own and operate a farm and livestock operation in Central Kansas. I married into the farming world in December 2010 and have spent every minute learning all that I can about farming and the rural lifestyle. I work in town as the marketing and communications manager for a commercial construction company, mobile occupational services company and safety consulting and training firm. In the hours outside the office, I help on the farm in any way I can – and sometimes that means just staying out of the way. This blog tracks my experiences as I learn what a life on the farm really means. I wouldn’t change this lifestyle for the world. Farmers and ranchers are some of the hardest working individuals in the world and they do what they do 365 days a year to ensure everyone has access to a safe, healthy and affordable food supply. If you want to learn more about agriculture or our operation, please don’t hesitate to contact me on this blog or at katie.sawyer@sawyerlandandcattle.com. I would love to show you around.
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By Katie Stockstill-Sawyer
May 9, 2013 12:01 a.m.



This time last year, we were two weeks from wheat harvest. A dry winter and spring had allowed Central Kansas farmers to get corn in the ground, land worked for planting soybeans and has pushed the wheat into early harvest.

But this year has proven exactly the opposite. The corn is still in the bag and the wheat is great and on-track for a late June harvest. The thought of planting soybeans hasn’t even crossed most farmers’ mind.

The difference is due to rain. Sweet, wet, glorious rain. The moisture we have yearned for the past two years and desperately need to fill our ponds, green our pastures and grow our crops. But the rain – which started as snow in late February – has continued through March and April and effectively delayed corn planting.

As my husband about planting corn and he grumbles but stops shorts of complaining because the rain is essential.

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