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Wellington Daily News - Wellington, KS
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HISTORIC CHICKEN DINNER
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About this blog
By Linda Bassett
Author and culinary school teacher Linda Bassett provides recipes for and tips on the season's freshest ingredients. She is the author of \x34From Apple Pie to Pad Thai: Neighborhood Cooking North of Boston.\x34 Reach her by email at KitchenCall@aol. ...
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Kitchen Call
Author and culinary school teacher Linda Bassett provides recipes for and tips on the season's freshest ingredients. She is the author of \x34From Apple Pie to Pad Thai: Neighborhood Cooking North of Boston.\x34 Reach her by email at KitchenCall@aol.com.
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By lindabcooks
Oct. 1, 2013 12:01 a.m.



 

Okay, here it is, as promised.  A chicken dinner for any Sunday.

But this is not my grandmother’s chicken dinner.  Not a whole chicken, unless you buy the chicken in cut it into serving pieces yourself.  Something I do not suggest as it takes up unnecessary time.  I usually go to my favorite meat guy, and have him do it for me.  I am perfectly capable of cutting up a whole chicken myself, but have no time to waste, either cutting or cleaning it up.  I have him cut out the backbone, cut off the wing tips, then cut the rest of the chicken into 8 serving pieces.  I take home the backbone and wing tips for stock.  (I don’t consider making my own stock a waste of time.)

Anyway, this chicken dinner long preceded my grandma, who I think threatened to leave heaven to slap me upside the head if I didn’t make a civilized Sunday dinner. Napoleon’s chef is said to have cooked this either before or after the battle of Marengo.  Versions of the story vary.  But since it was a battlefield dish, his soldiers pilfered most of the ingredients from nearby farms – chickens, eggs, etc.  Don’t ask me where they got the shrimp.

The fried eggs are very trendy.  Who knew Napoleon’s troops would be trendy in an American big city in the twenty-first century?





POLLO AL MARENGO  (CHICKEN MARENGO)

Makes 6 servings

2 ½ pounds chicken, cut into 8 serving pieces





olive oil to film the bottom of the pan

2 cloves garlic, crushed

4 tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and chopped

1 cup dry white wine

6 or 12 slices French bread rounds (for crostini)

6 large eggs

6 extra large shrimp

1/4 cup parsley, chopped

Juice of 1 lemon (4 tablespoons)



  • Heat 2 tablespoons oil in skillet.  Add chicken, and cook, in batches, until golden on both sides. Remove chicken from pan; set aside.  Pour off and reserve the remaining oil.






  • Heat 2 tablespoons fresh olive oil in the skillet.  Add garlic, swirling it around the pan until it is lightly golden, to flavor; discard garlic. Return chicken to the pan; add tomatoes, salt, pepper, and wine.  Cook until the chicken is tender, cooked through, and reaches about 155 to 160 degrees, 30 to 45 minutes.






  • Reheat pan.  Add the bread; cook until golden on both sides; set aside. 






  • Break eggs into pan, and cook as preferred, sunny-side-up or over-easy. Set aside.  Add shrimp to pan; cook until pink.






  • Arrange all the elements on a serving platter:  Place the chicken pieces in the center.  Surround them with the pan-toasted bread (crostini) and lemon wedges. Top half the  crostini with eggs, the   remainder with shrimp.  Sprinkle parsley over everything. 




 

 

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