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Wellington Daily News - Wellington, KS
  • Family Time: Easy ideas you can use to grow your child’s imagination

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  • Tip of the Week
    Albert Einstein once said, “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” It’s a pretty amazing statement when you consider just how much knowledge Einstein possessed. Today’s world always has a spot for creative, imaginative people. Whether they are designing the next dot com or the latest menu sensation, imaginative people are thriving everywhere.
    So how can you help to strengthen your little one’s imagination and ensure they are as creative as possible? From analog to the digital, there are more fun, innovative ideas that can foster imagination than ever before. The following tips can help you grow your child’s imagination while creating some enjoyable, long-lasting memories along the way.
    * Create the scene. Playing dress-up doesn’t have to be exclusive to tea parties. Encourage your child to dawn a costume and create a character based on that costume. The costumes can be lavish enough to include makeup or as simplistic as a new hat or mask. The important thing is that your child creates a new character or takes an existing character - depending on the costume - in a new direction using his or her imagination. Just make sure you dress up, too; this production needs a supporting cast.
    * Encourage ad-libbing during story time. Reading to your child is a great way to strengthen their love of books and their reading comprehension skills. If you want to grow their imagination as well, make reading more interactive. Before you flip the page, ask your child what they think will happen next. They’ll create the story in their mind, and the answers may amaze you.
    * Give them room to make their masterpiece. Art is one of the easiest ways to allow your child to develop their imagination. Create an environment that supports their artistic interests by setting aside space for a mini-studio. Make sure to include paints, crayons, markers and a big roll of paper to serve as their canvas. Line the area with newspaper because even the most determined little artists still make a mess from time to time.
    * Take time to explore. These warm-weather months are the perfect opportunity for that nature hike or trip to the park. Turn the trip into an expedition by asking your child to create their own archeological adventure. This will make the warm-weather journey more enjoyable for both of you.
    A child’s imagination opens their mind to limitless possibilities and no matter where their imagination takes the two of you, you’ll enjoy spending the time together.
    - Brandpoint
    Family Movie Night
    “The Amazing Spider-Man 2”
    Rated: PG-13
    Length: 142 minutes
    Synopsis: Peter Parker runs the gauntlet as the mysterious company Oscorp sends up a slew of supervillains against him.
    Page 2 of 2 - Violence/scary rating: 3.5
    Sexual-content rating: 1.5
    Profanity rating: 2
    Drugs/alcohol rating: 2
    Family Time rating: 3. In line with other recent superhero flicks.
    (Ratings are judged on a five-point scale, with 5 being “bad for kids” and 1 being “fine for kids.”)
    Book Report
    “This Is a Moose,” by Richard T. Morris (author), Tom Lichtenheld (artist)
    Ages: 3-6
    Pages: 48
    Synopsis: MOOSE? Yes, Moose! When a movie director tries to capture the life of a moose on film, he’s in for a big surprise. It turns out the moose has a dream bigger than just being a moose - he wants to be an astronaut and go to the moon. His forest friends step in to help him, and action ensues. Lots of action. Like a lacrosse-playing grandma, a gigantic slingshot into space, and a flying, superhero chipmunk. In this hilarious romp, Richard T. Morris and bestselling illustrator Tom Lichtenheld remind us to dream big and, when we do, to aim for the moon. - Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
    Did You Know
    A new study published in the Journal of Family Psychology found that parents spank their children more often than they admit. In an audiotaped study of 33 families, 15 of the families spanked or hit their preschooler(s) over a six-night period. The researchers said the same families under-reported their use of spanking.
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