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Wellington Daily News - Wellington, KS
  • Relay for Life raises money, hope

  • It was very moving witnessing the survivor lap at the Relay for Life event held Saturday evening at Wellington High School. Seeing how many people here have fought the battle with cancer, makes you realize there is hope.
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  • by Amber Schmitz
    It was very moving witnessing the survivor lap at the Relay for Life event held Saturday evening at Wellington High School. Seeing how many people here have fought the battle with cancer, makes you realize there is hope.
    Rebecca Robbins, committee member, said "This event is important to raise money for cancer research. I lost my grandma and father-in-law to cancer, and recently, my best friend was diagnosed with colon cancer. I am involved in it to honor and support them."
    Before the survivor lap, the local Boy Scouts did the presentation of colors, and the National Anthem was sung. This helped set the mood and get the event off to a great start.
    After the survivor lap, their caregivers joined them, before everyone else who wanted to walk laps joined in. The laps were taken around the high school gym, where the luminaries in memory of those who lost the battle, and honoring the survivors, stood awaiting for the luminaria ceremony. During the laps, a deejay played various songs, while names and pictures of survivors were shown on the wall with a projector.
    Students of Michelle's Encore Dance Studio performed for the crowd, and were joined by a group of children who just learned a routine that morning. They put on a wonderful performance!  Michelle Crittenden, owner of the studio, said "I like to use the studio to do positive things in the community. I really wanted to offer fun entertainment and to bring more people to the event. Some dancers donated money, hopefully they visit the concession stand or a booth! Whether raising money, or awareness- that's really what it's all about."
    Names of survivors were drawn for door prizes. Winners were asked to announce their name and how long they've been a cancer survivor. Many answered with 10, 16 and even 19 years!
    A balloon release, where people could write notes in to loved ones in heaven, was held at 6 p.m. Sunday at Penny's Diner.
    What tugged at my heart the most, was seeing Daxter Rosewicz, who is four years old and will begin preschool in the fall, and is the only child of Ben and Bailey Rosewicz, whom I had the pleasure of visiting with. He was the youngest cancer survivor there. Although he still must be screened every four and six months, he has been cancer free for three years!
    "The event helps us remember what we have gone through and that we need to appreciate him (Daxter). He's an angel, he's a miracle. It's also important for others to know that they are being supported. He's (Daxter) my superhero! If he can get through cancer, I can get through anything," said Ben Rosewicz.
    Page 2 of 2 - Although a very emotional and tear-jerking event, it's also celebratory of those who have battled cancer bravely and won, and those who have lost the battle with cancer. All funding goes toward finding a cure for this disease which effects so many people, whether they have cancer, know someone with cancer, or have lost a loved one.
     
     
     
     
     

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