The hubs checks the monitor of one of his sub-surface drip irrigation systems while the kiddo splashes in water. Sometimes work errands make for great family trips.


It’s been nearly a month since I’ve updated my blog and I promise my absence isn’t a reflection of inactivity on the farm. Far from it! It has been a month of wheat harvest, milo planting, family trips and all the other things that make life busy for my family of three.


There has been much publicized about this year’s wheat harvest. It was definitely one for the books but not because of devastating drought as spring headlines predicted. Much the opposite. A week of nearly continuous rain brought much-needed moisture but also halted harvest. My hubby and his cutting crew were out of the field for nearly a week waiting for things to dry – that meant lots of daddy-son time! When they did get back to work, it was easy to see where the tractors had treaded as ruts and mud piles now mark the fields. Even yesterday (July 12) my husband continued to cut wheat – cleaning up low, muddy spots and corners.


When the combines weren’t cutting, the planter was at work planting soybeans and milo into wheat stubble. With continued moisture, we could see a spectacular fall harvest of all crops.


The cows remain at pasture in the Flint Hills and are thriving on the lush, green grass. We continue to visit our animals to ensure all are doing well and this week we will check our cows to see which are pregnant with the 2015 calf crop. One of the reasons we continue to calve in the winter and early spring is because our pregnant mother cows can take advantage of the nutrients provided by summer grazing. Grass is an excellent food source for cows and one that we strive to utilize as long as possible.


Finally, despite the June rains, my husband and his father remained this week busy starting irrigation systems. We were fortunate enough to convert an old, in-efficient pivot into a sub-surface drip irrigation system earlier this year. That means fewer breakdowns and more efficient irrigation. It also means more family time because my husband is less likely to have to spend his evenings getting a pivot un-stuck or changing gates on a flood irrigations system. Technology is great for many reasons, including it’s time-saving efficiencies.


This week, will be spent planning for a farm tour that will visit our crops next weekend. I’m excited to welcome a group of Central Kansas ladies to our farm – through the Kansas CommonGround organization – and answer their questions about food and farming.


The hubs checks the monitor of one of his sub-surface drip irrigation systems while the kiddo splashes in water. Sometimes work errands make for great family trips.

It’s been nearly a month since I’ve updated my blog and I promise my absence isn’t a reflection of inactivity on the farm. Far from it! It has been a month of wheat harvest, milo planting, family trips and all the other things that make life busy for my family of three.

There has been much publicized about this year’s wheat harvest. It was definitely one for the books but not because of devastating drought as spring headlines predicted. Much the opposite. A week of nearly continuous rain brought much-needed moisture but also halted harvest. My hubby and his cutting crew were out of the field for nearly a week waiting for things to dry – that meant lots of daddy-son time! When they did get back to work, it was easy to see where the tractors had treaded as ruts and mud piles now mark the fields. Even yesterday (July 12) my husband continued to cut wheat – cleaning up low, muddy spots and corners.

When the combines weren’t cutting, the planter was at work planting soybeans and milo into wheat stubble. With continued moisture, we could see a spectacular fall harvest of all crops.

The cows remain at pasture in the Flint Hills and are thriving on the lush, green grass. We continue to visit our animals to ensure all are doing well and this week we will check our cows to see which are pregnant with the 2015 calf crop. One of the reasons we continue to calve in the winter and early spring is because our pregnant mother cows can take advantage of the nutrients provided by summer grazing. Grass is an excellent food source for cows and one that we strive to utilize as long as possible.

Finally, despite the June rains, my husband and his father remained this week busy starting irrigation systems. We were fortunate enough to convert an old, in-efficient pivot into a sub-surface drip irrigation system earlier this year. That means fewer breakdowns and more efficient irrigation. It also means more family time because my husband is less likely to have to spend his evenings getting a pivot un-stuck or changing gates on a flood irrigations system. Technology is great for many reasons, including it’s time-saving efficiencies.

This week, will be spent planning for a farm tour that will visit our crops next weekend. I’m excited to welcome a group of Central Kansas ladies to our farm – through the Kansas CommonGround organization – and answer their questions about food and farming.