|
|
Wellington Daily News - Wellington, KS
  • Museum's soda fountain brings back memories

  • Pat (Hoskins) Burner has very fond memories of working at Cook's Drug Store in Wellington in 1943 when she was 16 years old."We sold sandwiches, and when Mr. Cook wasn't looking, we'd dip a potato chip into the chicken salad or ham salad and sample it," she laughed.She flew up here and now lives in Indiana. Burner and...
    • email print
  • By Amber Schmitz
    The Wellington Daily News
    Pat (Hoskins) Burner has very fond memories of working at Cook's Drug Store in Wellington in 1943 when she was 16 years old.
    "We sold sandwiches, and when Mr. Cook wasn't looking, we'd dip a potato chip into the chicken salad or ham salad and sample it," she laughed.
    She flew up here and now lives in Indiana. Burner and her daughter, Nancy Carrithers, were in town and came to the opening of the display at the Chisholm Museum on Saturday.
    She said she made 30 cents an hour working there, and was employed for about three years. She saved up her money, and used it to pay for college in Pittsburg, which then only cost $60 per semester. She earned her teaching degree there.
    "Everyone wore penny loafers back then," she recalled. "They had no support, so I ruined my feet working there."
    Burner said she had trouble remembering who ordered what, so she'd write down initials or a description of the person on her ordering pad.
    "First, you squirted the flavored syrup in (to make a soda), then mixed in a glass with soda water," Burner said. "If it was one of your friends, of course, you added extra syrup. A soda cost 25 cents."
    Clyde Cook Sr. purchased Lawrence Drug Store in 1948. This is not to be confused with Cook's Drug Store, which was right down the street. In 1954, there were five drug stores in Wellington.
    Gerald and Connie Bales purchased Walters Drug Store in 1954, and changed the name to Chief Drug Store. Up until two years ago, Bales, who recently celebrated his 90th birthday, was still a practicing pharmacist, said his son, Jim Bales, museum volunteer.
    The Chisholm Trail Museum acquired the original Lawrence Drug Store soda fountain through the hard work of Jami Kuchar. When Kuchar found out The Dore was selling it, she wanted to purchase it for her home, Bales said, but found it to be unrealistic, as its so big and heavy. Kuchar was determined to restore it. She contacted the museum and asked if they'd like to have it, then contacted Security State Bank, who donated funds toward the restoration project. She also held a fundraiser for the fountain display.
    The museum graciously donated space for the fountain, and Jefferies Construction took out a window to make it possible for its placement. Bales said he tried to lift the fountain with his equipment, but it was too heavy. They contacted Belger Crane, who sent a fork lift down for a discounted price.
    Kuchar volunteered to do most of the painting of the display room, with the help of Carrie Cook, museum volunteer.
    "Jami (Kuchar) did most of the work, she definitely deserves the credit," Bales said.
    Page 2 of 2 - Other artifacts in the display include soda fountain glasses from Chief Drug Store, pictures from Kuchar and the museum, and a light from the old Woolworth's store.
    On Sat., July 26th, the museum held a grand opening to show off the display, which is dedicated to all historical soda fountains. Free ice cream, with choices of a brown cow, strawberry or chocolate soda, was given to visitors.
    "I hope that people see the display and donate more artifacts," Bales said. "If you can link it to Sumner County or Wellington's history, we would be glad to have it."

        calendar