Mason Lough is a busy teenager. He takes a rigorous class load at Wellington High School, serves in National Honor Society, performs in band and choir, plays in a side band with his brother and works a part-time job at El Chile Verde…

Oh, and he’s a National Merit Scholarship semifinalist.

“I’m pretty proud of myself,” Lough said. “I knew about National Merit. I didn’t know what it entailed.”

The nationwide pool of semifinalists represents less than one percent of U.S. high school seniors. These academically talented high school seniors have an opportunity to advance to finalist standing and to be considered for a National Merit Scholarship. To become a finalist, the semifinalist and a high school official must submit a detailed scholarship application, providing information about the Semifinalists academic record, participation in school and community activities, demonstrated leadership abilities, employment, and honors and awards received. They also have to have an outstanding academic record and earn a high score on the SAT or ACT.

Lough earned a 34 on the ACT. The highest score possible is 36.

While admitting to procrastination, Lough said he keeps organized and self-motivated to do things even when it gets hard. 

“I feel like I do so many things, there’s always something that captures my attention,” Lough said. “There’s always something different I’m involved with.”

“He gets antsy,” his mother, Carrie Lough, said.

He credits his second grade teacher from Kennedy Elementary, Ms. Kiker, with changing the way he looked at school through the things she did and ways she taught.

“She was monumental on changing his mind about school,” Carrie Lough said. “He wasn’t big on school for the first two years.”

Mason Lough credited his parents for his high academic standing. 

“They’re pretty much the reason my grades stay As,” he said, adding that his parents provide “encouragement with a little pressure.”

Lough is hoping the community service he has performed with NHS will pay off in the next few months as he applies to colleges. He has already been accepted into a few universities and has narrowed down a “top five” of schools to choose from - including Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, Middle Tennessee and Tulane University in New Orleans.

He plays in a band with his brother, Hunter, called the Lough Brothers, playing pop and country music and writing their own songs. Lough plans to pursue a career in music.

“I want to be in a studio, producing people’s music or producing for film or TV,” he said.

His plan B is to become a college band instructor. If he’s not doing homework, applying for scholarships, playing gigs with his band, working or any other number of things - if he’s not doing anything, it doesn’t seem right, Lough said.

“I’m pretty busy all the time,” he said. “It makes the days go faster.”

 





 

 

 

 

Mason Lough is a busy teenager. He takes a rigorous class load at Wellington High School, serves in National Honor Society, performs in band and choir, plays in a side band with his brother and works a part-time job at El Chile Verde…

 

Oh, and he’s a National Merit Scholarship semifinalist.

 

“I’m pretty proud of myself,” Lough said. “I knew about National Merit. I didn’t know what it entailed.”

 

The nationwide pool of semifinalists represents less than one percent of U.S. high school seniors. These academically talented high school seniors have an opportunity to advance to finalist standing and to be considered for a National Merit Scholarship. To become a finalist, the semifinalist and a high school official must submit a detailed scholarship application, providing information about the Semifinalists academic record, participation in school and community activities, demonstrated leadership abilities, employment, and honors and awards received. They also have to have an outstanding academic record and earn a high score on the SAT or ACT.

 

Lough earned a 34 on the ACT. The highest score possible is 36.

 

While admitting to procrastination, Lough said he keeps organized and self-motivated to do things even when it gets hard. 

 

“I feel like I do so many things, there’s always something that captures my attention,” Lough said. “There’s always something different I’m involved with.”

 

“He gets antsy,” his mother, Carrie Lough, said.

 

He credits his second grade teacher from Kennedy Elementary, Ms. Kiker, with changing the way he looked at school through the things she did and ways she taught.

 

“She was monumental on changing his mind about school,” Carrie Lough said. “He wasn’t big on school for the first two years.”

 

Mason Lough credited his parents for his high academic standing. 

 

“They’re pretty much the reason my grades stay As,” he said, adding that his parents provide “encouragement with a little pressure.”

 

Lough is hoping the community service he has performed with NHS will pay off in the next few months as he applies to colleges. He has already been accepted into a few universities and has narrowed down a “top five” of schools to choose from - including Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, Middle Tennessee and Tulane University in New Orleans.

 

He plays in a band with his brother, Hunter, called the Lough Brothers, playing pop and country music and writing their own songs. Lough plans to pursue a career in music.

 

“I want to be in a studio, producing people’s music or producing for film or TV,” he said.

 

His plan B is to become a college band instructor. If he’s not doing homework, applying for scholarships, playing gigs with his band, working or any other number of things - if he’s not doing anything, it doesn’t seem right, Lough said.

 

“I’m pretty busy all the time,” he said. “It makes the days go faster.”

 





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mason Lough is a busy teenager. He takes a rigorous class load at Wellington High School, serves in National Honor Society, performs in band and choir, plays in a side band with his brother and works a part-time job at El Chile Verde…

 

Oh, and he’s a National Merit Scholarship semifinalist.

 

“I’m pretty proud of myself,” Lough said. “I knew about National Merit. I didn’t know what it entailed.”

 

The nationwide pool of semifinalists represents less than one percent of U.S. high school seniors. These academically talented high school seniors have an opportunity to advance to finalist standing and to be considered for a National Merit Scholarship. To become a finalist, the semifinalist and a high school official must submit a detailed scholarship application, providing information about the Semifinalists academic record, participation in school and community activities, demonstrated leadership abilities, employment, and honors and awards received. They also have to have an outstanding academic record and earn a high score on the SAT or ACT.

 

Lough earned a 34 on the ACT. The highest score possible is 36.

 

While admitting to procrastination, Lough said he keeps organized and self-motivated to do things even when it gets hard. 

 

“I feel like I do so many things, there’s always something that captures my attention,” Lough said. “There’s always something different I’m involved with.”

 

“He gets antsy,” his mother, Carrie Lough, said.

 

He credits his second grade teacher from Kennedy Elementary, Ms. Kiker, with changing the way he looked at school through the things she did and ways she taught.

 

“She was monumental on changing his mind about school,” Carrie Lough said. “He wasn’t big on school for the first two years.”

 

Mason Lough credited his parents for his high academic standing. 

 

“They’re pretty much the reason my grades stay As,” he said, adding that his parents provide “encouragement with a little pressure.”

 

Lough is hoping the community service he has performed with NHS will pay off in the next few months as he applies to colleges. He has already been accepted into a few universities and has narrowed down a “top five” of schools to choose from - including Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, Middle Tennessee and Tulane University in New Orleans.

 

He plays in a band with his brother, Hunter, called the Lough Brothers, playing pop and country music and writing their own songs. Lough plans to pursue a career in music.

 

“I want to be in a studio, producing people’s music or producing for film or TV,” he said.

 

His plan B is to become a college band instructor. If he’s not doing homework, applying for scholarships, playing gigs with his band, working or any other number of things - if he’s not doing anything, it doesn’t seem right, Lough said.

 

“I’m pretty busy all the time,” he said. “It makes the days go faster.”

 





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mason Lough is a busy teenager. He takes a rigorous class load at Wellington High School, serves in National Honor Society, performs in band and choir, plays in a side band with his brother and works a part-time job at El Chile Verde…

Oh, and he’s a National Merit Scholarship semifinalist.

“I’m pretty proud of myself,” Lough said. “I knew about National Merit. I didn’t know what it entailed.”

The nationwide pool of semifinalists represents less than one percent of U.S. high school seniors. These academically talented high school seniors have an opportunity to advance to finalist standing and to be considered for a National Merit Scholarship. To become a finalist, the semifinalist and a high school official must submit a detailed scholarship application, providing information about the Semifinalists academic record, participation in school and community activities, demonstrated leadership abilities, employment, and honors and awards received. They also have to have an outstanding academic record and earn a high score on the SAT or ACT.

Lough earned a 34 on the ACT. The highest score possible is 36.

While admitting to procrastination, Lough said he keeps organized and self-motivated to do things even when it gets hard. 

“I feel like I do so many things, there’s always something that captures my attention,” Lough said. “There’s always something different I’m involved with.”

“He gets antsy,” his mother, Carrie Lough, said.

He credits his second grade teacher from Kennedy Elementary, Ms. Kiker, with changing the way he looked at school through the things she did and ways she taught.

“She was monumental on changing his mind about school,” Carrie Lough said. “He wasn’t big on school for the first two years.”

Mason Lough credited his parents for his high academic standing. 

“They’re pretty much the reason my grades stay As,” he said, adding that his parents provide “encouragement with a little pressure.”

Lough is hoping the community service he has performed with NHS will pay off in the next few months as he applies to colleges. He has already been accepted into a few universities and has narrowed down a “top five” of schools to choose from - including Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, Middle Tennessee and Tulane University in New Orleans.

He plays in a band with his brother, Hunter, called the Lough Brothers, playing pop and country music and writing their own songs. Lough plans to pursue a career in music.

“I want to be in a studio, producing people’s music or producing for film or TV,” he said.

His plan B is to become a college band instructor. If he’s not doing homework, applying for scholarships, playing gigs with his band, working or any other number of things - if he’s not doing anything, it doesn’t seem right, Lough said.

“I’m pretty busy all the time,” he said. “It makes the days go faster.”