In light of the present health danger in gatherings, several churches in Wellington are going to online only services - at least until the coronavirus is contained.   At the Freewill Baptist Church, worship services are being suspended for the next eight weeks “or until the government ban is lifted,” reads a message on the church’s Facebook page.   “This is to discourage the spread of the infectious and contagious coronavirus that has caused a global pandemic,” the message reads. “We want to do our part and adhere to our governing authorities.”   Freewill Baptist’s Sunday services will be live streamed on Facebook at 11 a.m. Sunday.   “I think I can honestly say for the entire church family, this is an unprecedented time,” Freewill Baptist Church Administrator Charlotte Brooks said. “We’re day by day trying to find our way through this.”   Wendell Skinner, pastor of Church Ignited, said the church will still have an in-person service this week, but will probably go to an online presence primarily next week.   “We are continually looking at new ways to be the church in a new world, a world where direct contact is dangerous and counterproductive,” Skinner said.   Freewill Baptist’s Food Bank will remain open Tuesdays from 4 to 5 p.m. and the church office will remain open Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., but anyone with symptoms of COVID-19 or who has traveled to an infected area are asked not to visit the church or any home gatherings for 14 days. Tithing is available through mail or through the church website - wellingtonfreewill.com.   The Wellington United Methodist Church and First Presbyterian Churches are suspending activities on church premises until April 4, but will be live-streaming. The First Baptist Church and Slate Valley Fellowship Church will go to strictly online services this Sunday and re-evaluate after that.   Wendell Skinner, pastor of Church Ignited, said the church will still have an in-person service this week, but will probably go to an online presence primarily next week.   “We are continually looking at new ways to be the church in a new world, a world where direct contact is dangerous and counterproductive,” Skinner said.   Jon Schellenger, pastor of the Church of the Nazarene, said dismissing all church activities going forward “has been one of the most difficult decisions I have ever made.”   Schellenger said he had to cancel services three times in one year at a church he pastored in Wyoming due to snow and ice.   “But we knew we would be right back together,” he said. “In this case it is more or less open ended. We simply don’t know when we will get back together.”   Bob Nusser, pastor of First Baptist and Slate Valley Fellowship churches, said he has not been visiting people personally to practice social distancing but he has been staying in contact with church members by phone and through computer technology.   Schellenger said, “One thing is different in our day and that is we have so many other ways to stay connected in our congregations that we didn’t have not that long ago.”   He quoted the Bible verse, Hebrews 9:25: “Let us not give up meeting together.”   “Now that we can’t meet together in a physical place, we must meet together in the ways our new technology allows us to do that,” Schellenger said.   Brooks, the wife of Freewill Baptist pastor Zane Brooks, said, “It is a discouraging time, but we understand that we have to do the right thing to protect, actually, our whole country.”   James Byers, of the First Christian Church, in a Facebook message, regarding the church’s move to online only services, quoted a line from C.S. Lewis’s book, “The Magician’s Nephew” - “What you see and what you hear depends a lot on where you are standing. It also depends on what kind of person you are.”   Byers said, “In a sense we’re all standing in the same place in the world. We’re all standing in the midst of COVID-19. Standing in Italy is different from standing in Sumner County, Kansas and yet because we’re so aware of the reality all around the world, we’re all affected by what’s happening everywhere.”   Byers said as different people, we all respond differently to the crisis.   “But if we’re a people of faith, therefore we’re a people who believe and trust in God,” Byers said in the video message. “Then we will see and hear our way through this with faith in our creator.”   Nusser also said people are responding differently to the crisis.   “With a lot of folks, it‘s just the unknown,” he said. “We’re all a little bit anxious about our health and about the situation because it changes day to day. We don’t know what’s coming next. I remind them of who’s ultimately in control.”