SUBSCRIBE NOW
As low as $3 for 3 months
SUBSCRIBE NOW
As low as $3 for 3 months

Kansas sees over 5,700 new cases of COVID-19 since Monday

Andrew Bahl
abahl@gannett.com
Kansas Department of Health and Environment Secretary Lee Norman speaks about COVID-19 in this photo. KDHE reported over 5,700 new cases of COVID-19 since Monday.

Kansas reported Wednesday an increase of 5,778 COVID-19 cases since Monday, alongside over 140 new hospitalizations reported in that timeframe.

The number of deaths in the state rose by 85 as well, although it appears that many of those occurred earlier in the pandemic and have only recently been confirmed by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.

Overall, 1,941 COVID-19-related deaths have been recorded since the pandemic began in March.

There are currently active 462 COVID-19 clusters across the state, accounting for over 16,000 cases. Most of those remain in long term care facilities and corrections.

Multiple meatpacking plants, as well as Spirit Aerosystems in Wichita, also continue to report outbreaks, according to KDHE.

Some major hospitals are seeing their numbers of COVID-19 patients hold steady, although officials at The University of Kansas Health System said they are already beginning to see cases tied to gatherings over the Thanksgiving holiday.

“That is the start of the rise and we won’t really know now (the extent) for another six or eight weeks, which I think is what we saw with some other events,” said Steve Stites, chief medical officer for the KU Health System. “If the younger people are getting infected first then it is just a ripple effect.”

Stormont Vail Hospital in Topeka reported 76 COVID-19 patients in their facility, a slight dip from what it has seen in recent days.

Still, the Kansas Hospital Association reports that only 31% of staffed, inpatient intensive care beds are free as of Monday.

And the White House Coronavirus Task Force said in a report sent to all 50 states that it is not a time for complacency.

"This current fall to winter surge continues to spread to every corner of the U.S., from small towns to large cities, from farms to beach communities," the report, obtained by ABC News, read.